Jail Pro Lesson Summaries

2022 Lesson 6: PREA Part 2

Legal

Release Date: 

6/1/2022

This is Part 2 of a two-part online technical skills lesson on preventing confinement sexual abuse/PREA for officers.
    Section six examines the official response to reports of sexual  harassment and sexual abuse, including PREA’s requirement that covered  agency staff report even mere suspicion of sexual abuse or sexual  harassment. The lesson outlines: the duty of agencies to protect  inmates; the duty of first responders to protect inmates and preserve  evidence; the duty of agencies to protect inmates from retaliation.
    Section seven examines investigations of sexual assault in confinement.  It details PREA’s requirements for criminal and administrative agency  investigations of sexual abuse in jails or lockups. It explains the  evidentiary standards applicable to investigations of sexual abuse and  sexual harassment in jails and lockups and the requirement that jails  inform inmates of the results of these investigations.
    Section eight addresses PREA’s disciplinary and corrective measures  towards each of the following offenders: staff, contractors, volunteers,  inmates, and detainees.
    Section nine explains PREA’s  medical and mental health care requirements for victims of sexual abuse  in jails and lockups. Section ten provides an overview of PREA’s data  collection requirements.
    Section eleven examines  anti-fraternization polices and how they can be used to help prevent  sexual harassment and sexual abuse. It examines the types of conduct  that policies may prohibit and provides examples of problematic  relationships from actual cases.
    Section twelve  addresses LGBTQ detainees and inmates. It provides officers with  definitions of terms relevant to the LGBTQ community and explains how to  use them appropriately.
    Section thirteen addresses  policies and procedures related to LGBTQ detainees and inmates. It  examines PREA requirements specific to this population and provides  policy recommendations from LGBTQ advocacy organizations regarding:  determining gender; intake policies; search policies; and housing  policies.
    Section fourteen addresses mandatory reporter requirements.

2022 Lesson 5: PREA Part 1

Legal

Release Date: 

5/1/2022

This is Part 1 of a two-part online technical skills lesson on preventing confinement sexual abuse/PREA for correctional officers. The  purpose of this lesson is to provide basic information and guidance to  correctional officers regarding the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003  (“PREA”). Despite what the name implies, PREA does not just apply to  prisons nor does it just apply to rape. Rather, it protects anyone in confinement, even in a halfway house or tribal facility, from any type  of sexual assault or sexual harassment by staff, inmates, contractors,  volunteers, or others. Accordingly, it is important for correctional  officers to have a basic understanding of PREA requirements, both  because they interact with detainees/inmates and because they sometimes  investigate crimes committed against them. This lesson focuses on the  PREA standards applicable in jails and police lockups. The lesson  provides examples from actual cases of sexual abuse by inmates and  staff.
    This lesson examines the dynamics of sexual  abuse in detention, including the prevalence of detention sexual abuse  and risk factors for victimization. It explains the continuum of abusive  behaviors, identifies how heterosexism and homophobia in detention  facilities can encourage the targeting of anyone who does not conform to  gender norms, and examines common barriers victims face to reporting sexual abuse in jails and detention facilities.
    The  lesson includes PREA definitions. It explains PREA’s required  zero-tolerance policy towards all forms of sexual abuse and sexual  harassment. It examines PREA requirements regarding: the housing of  youthful inmates, cross-gender viewing and searches, inmates with  disabilities, evidence protocols, and training requirements.
    The lesson explains PREA’s risk-screening requirements and their  importance to police. Finally, the lesson examines PREA’s reporting and  investigations requirements, including the requirement that agencies  provide multiple internal ways for inmates to privately report sexual  abuse and sexual harassment, retaliation, and neglect.

2022 Lesson 4: Caselaw Update

Legal

Release Date: 

4/1/2022

This lesson provides legal training for jailers and correctional  officers through an analysis of three Target Cases answering the  following questions:

- Does limiting inmates’ access to pictorial sexually explicit materials violate their First Amendment rights?

- What duty does a jail supervisor have to train and supervise their subordinates?

- When can a jail supervisor be held liable for unconstitutional acts by their subordinates?

- When can a county be held liable for injuries to jail inmates?

- Why must jailers refrain from retaliating against an inmate who files grievances against jail staff?

2022 Lesson 3: Caselaw Update

Legal

Release Date: 

3/1/2022

This lesson provides legal training for jailers and correctional  officers through an analysis of three Target Cases answering the  following questions:

- Can jailers confiscate forms from inmates when those forms could be used to file fraudulent liens?

- What is Ramadan?

- What obligation do jailers have to accommodate inmates’ nutritional requirements during Ramadan?

- When does a jailer have an obligation to help an inmate seek medical care?

- Does an inmate’s constitutional right to medical care include illnesses that do not present an apparent risk of death?

- When an inmate’s own behavior causes a serious medical need to arise, what is the jailer’s responsibility?

2022 Lesson 2: Caselaw Update

Legal

Release Date: 

2/1/2022

This lesson provides legal training for jailers and correctional officers through an analysis of three Target Cases answering the following questions: 

-What obligation do jailers have to correctly determine an inmate’s gender when deciding where to house the inmate?

-How do jail inmate grievance processes operate? 

-Why is it important that jailers understand how their jail’s grievance process operates?

-What happens when a jail does not administer its own grievance process properly?

-Do inmates have a constitutional right to marry?

-What limitations can a jail constitutionally place on inmate requests to marry?

2022 Lesson 1: Caselaw Update

Legal

Release Date: 

1/1/2022

This lesson provides legal training for jailers and correctional officers through an analysis of three Target Cases answering the following questions: 

-Under what conditions will jail officials be held liable for violating an inmate’s constitutional rights to a requested religious diet?

-When must a jail accommodate an inmate’s hearing disability? 

-What are examples of appropriate auxiliary aids and services that may be offered to hearing-impaired inmates to allow them to participate in services, programs, or activities conducted within a jail?

-When are inmates entitled to receive damages for violations of their rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act?

2021 Lesson 12: Caselaw Update

Legal

Release Date: 

12/1/2021

This lesson provides legal training for jailers and correctional officers through an analysis of three Target Cases answering the following questions: 

-Under what conditions may jail officials restrict an inmate’s visiting privileges with their minor children?

-When may an inmate carry a cane inside a jail? 

-What are legitimate penological reasons supporting a jailer’s decision to confiscate an inmate’s cane?

-What constitutional rights may be implicated when a jailer confiscates an inmate’s cane?

-Do pregnant inmates have a constitutional right not to be shackled during labor, delivery, and postpartum recovery? 

-What are the risks to a pregnant inmate when using shackles during labor, delivery, and postpartum recovery?

-When may it be appropriate to use shackles during labor, delivery, and postpartum recovery?

2021 Lesson 11: Caselaw Update

Legal

Release Date: 

11/1/2021

This lesson provides legal training for jailers and correctional officers through an analysis of three Target Cases answering the following questions: 

-Under what conditions may jail officials open and inspect an inmate’s legal mail?

-When can a jailer restrain an inmate in a restraint chair? 

-What constitutional rights are implicated when using a restraint chair on an inmate?

-What precautions must a jailer take when an inmate is placed in a restraint chair?

-Do inmates have a constitutional right to adequate medical care when they present as a risk for suicide?

-What triggers a jail official’s duty to act to keep the inmate safe from suicide?

2021 Lesson 10: Caselaw Update

Legal

Release Date: 

10/1/2021

This lesson provides legal training for jailers and correctional officers through an analysis of three Target Cases answering the following questions: 

-What constitutes an unconstitutional strip search upon which a county can be held liable for money damages?

-Why is it always a bad idea to have sex with an inmate? 

-What rights does an inmate have against being sexually assaulted by a jailer? 

-Do inmates of county jails have a right to vote while incarcerated? 

-Are jail officials responsible for helping inmates who have requested their assistance in obtaining an absentee ballot?

-Are jail officials who prevent jail inmates from exercising their right to vote shielded from liability under the doctrine of qualified immunity?

2021 Lesson 9: Arrest & Detention of Foreign Nationals/Consular Notification

Legal

Release Date: 

9/1/2021

This lesson addresses what jailers and correctional officers need to know about the arrest and detention of foreign nationals and their duty to make consular notifications. The lesson explains the procedure to follow to determine if an arrestee is a foreign nation, the different between mandatory and non-mandatory notification countries, and how to make consular notifications. 

2021 Lesson 8: Caselaw Update

Legal

Release Date: 

8/1/2021

This lesson provides legal training for jailers and correctional officers through an analysis of three Target Cases answering the following questions: 

-Under what circumstances can jailers be held liable for failing to protect a transgender inmate from suffering injuries inflicted by another inmate, and then for failing to provide the injured inmate with medical care?

-What should jail officials know about extraditions so that they do not violate an inmate’s constitutional rights and subject themselves to civil liability?

-When can a county be liable for failing to train its jailers?

2021 Lesson 7: Caselaw Update

Legal

Release Date: 

7/1/2021

This lesson provides legal training for jailers and correctional officers through an analysis of three Target Cases answering the following questions: 

-When can the use of spit masks result in liability to jail officials and to their government employers?

-Does an inmate’s constitutional right to wear his hair at any length shield the inmate from the consequences for violating the jail's hair length policy?

-Can a jailer/deputy-sheriff be held liable in a civil suit by members of the public who were traumatized by an inmate who, due to the jailer’s negligence, gains possession of the jailer’s gun?

2021 Lesson 6: Caselaw Update

Legal

Release Date: 

6/1/2021

This lesson provides legal training for jailers and correctional officers through an analysis of three Target Cases answering the following questions: 

- When will jail officials have immunity from a lawsuit that is based on the wrongful death of an inmate who was exhibiting heroine withdrawal symptoms?

- When must jail officials accommodate an inmate’s religious practice?

- When will jailers who restrain a person in a prone position be entitled to qualified immunity from a lawsuit alleging excessive force?

2021 Lesson 5: Caselaw Update

Legal

Release Date: 

5/1/2021

This lesson provides legal training for jailers and correctional officers through an analysis of three Target Cases answering the following questions: 

-When will a jail’s non-privileged correspondence rules violate the constitutional rights of inmates?

-When are jailers entitled to the protection of qualified immunity when their actions result in an inmate’s injury?

-When will law enforcement officials be denied qualified immunity for using a chokehold on someone they have in custody?

2021 Lesson 4: Caselaw Update

Legal

Release Date: 

4/1/2021

This lesson consists of major case analyses of three Target Cases. In the first Target Case, decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit, an inmate sued jail officials for prohibiting his access to the county’s law library. In the second Target Case, decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit, an inmate sued jail officials for violating his constitutional due process rights after they had placed him into disciplinary segregation. In the third Target Case, decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit, the representative for the estate of a former inmate sued jail officials (and the arresting officer) for incorrectly assessing the inmate’s serious medical condition as simply intoxication.

2021 Lesson 3: Caselaw Update

Legal

Release Date: 

3/1/2021

This lesson consists of major analyses of three Target Cases. In the first Target Case, decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6thCircuit, an inmate sued county jail officials when they failed to protect him from a violent, mentally disturbed cellmate. In the second Target Case, decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit, an inmate sued county jail officials for wrongful detention. In the third Target Case, decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit, the representative of a deceased inmate sued county jail officials for neglecting an inmate’s serious medical needs when the inmate died during a hunger strike.

2021 Lesson 2: Caselaw Update

Legal

Release Date: 

2/1/2021

This lesson consists of major case analyses of three Target Cases. In the first Target Case, decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit, pretrial detainees sued jail officials for failing to take reasonable and appropriate steps to prevent them from becoming infected by COVID-19. In the second Target Case, decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit, jail officials, acting pursuant to their agency’s recycling policy, erased video footage of a jail incident in which an inmate had been injured. In the third Target Case, decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit, an inmate sued jail officials after the inmate had suffered self-inflicted, irreparable injuries to his eyes.

2021 Lesson 1: Caselaw Update

Legal

Release Date: 

1/1/2021

This lesson consists of major case analyses of three Target Cases. In the first Target Case, decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit, an inmate sued jail officials for subjecting him to public humiliation. In the second Target Case, decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6thCircuit, an inmate sued jail officials for excessive use of force. In the third Target Case, decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8thCircuit, an inmate sued jail officials for failing to ensure he obtained appropriate medical treatment following dental surgery.

2020 Lesson 3: Caselaw Update

Legal

Release Date: 

12/1/2020

This is an online legal studies course. The first of the three Target Cases comprising this lesson was decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit in which a pretrial detainee sued the county sheriff and several jailers for failing to supply them with an adequate supply of water. The second case was decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit in which jailers were sued for failing to properly accommodate a wheelchair bound prisoner. The third case was decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit in which an inmate sued jailers  and argued that they had acted with deliberate indifference to his acute medical need.

2020 Lesson 2: Caselaw Update

Legal

Release Date: 

11/1/2020

This is an online legal studies course. The first of the three Target Cases comprising this lesson was decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit in which a deceased inmate’s estate sued the sheriff, two jailers, and a supervisor, for failing to prevent the inmate’s suicide. The second case was decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit in which jailers were sued for serving a Muslim inmate meals containing pork. The third case was decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit in which an inmate sued the sheriff and several jailers for the unsanitary conditions of the jail.